Hello, my name is Ms. Shin. Join me as I travel to New Orleans to study Climate Change and Caterpillars!

Sunday, October 3, 2010

SATURDAY IS CLEAN UP DAY!

Well Ladies and Gentlemen,

Today was the last day at the bunk house in Slidell, Louisiana. Tomorrow we return to New Orleans to study the caterpillars at the science lab at Tulane University. We cleaned up the bunk house from top to bottom, inside and out; it took awhile, but it is always important to make sure you are a good guest.
A special thank you to the Louisiana Wild Life Rangers (especially Mark) for letting us use their station during our scientific exploration!
When we arrived back in New Orleans, we immediately went to the science lab at Tulane to set up the caterpillars in their new home.
Also, Mark (our fearless Copperhead Snake Leader) managed to find two more caterpillars right in front of his house!

Both of these fuzzy, cute looking caterpillars are apparently poisonous.
Now, we will start logging, studying, and de-frassing the caterpillars we collected at the lab tomorrow, so stay tuned!
See you all soon!
Replying to Comments:
Nicole, I agree, caterpillars are awesome!
Victor, you are correct about the snake, good for you! We used the machete to cut down vines, tree limbs, and branches that were in our way. Oh, and the name of that caterpillar was "The Question Mark," because when it stays on the leaf, it takes the shape of a question mark!
Franklin, no I did NOT TOUCH THE WILD ALLIGATOR! =)
Darren, I didn't freak out when I saw El Guapo probably because I was far enough away, but I have to admit I was a bit scared. The first time I held a caterpillar I was a bit squeamish, but you get use to it. After awhile, it's just really cool!
Liana and Franklin, I'm glad you looked up the vocabulary words... the other's will have to do the same when I get back. So you two are ahead of the game!
Gaurav, The gray on top of the caterpillar are actually wasp eggs. When they hatch they will eat the caterpillar for food. I was very tired from all the kayaking, but my arms are o.k. It's good exercise. I didn't get to see El Guapo again, but I did see a lot of other smaller ones. One was even missing an arm. If you go to youtube you can see some of the alligators I saw, just type in Pearl River Alligator or Honey Island Swamp Alligator.
Jasmine and Ariel, I miss all of you too, but don't worry, I will see you soon!

Friday, October 1, 2010

I Spy... can you?

Hello Everybody,

Well first I want to say that I had so much fun Skyping with everyone. It was so amazing seeing you all again... I miss you all! I especially loved all the great questions you asked me and the scientists here; they were very impressed by your intellectual questions. I'm very happy that I will be back on Tuesday (which is picture day so my class don't forget to wear black and white) because there is still so much I want to share/show you all.

After we Skyped, we went back out to Honey Island Swamp and had our last day of collecting. I have to say, this one was a bit different from the others. It started out the same, but ended with a bit of a shocker. Take a look:

Can you pick out three dangerous things in this picture?
(Hint: One is man made, but the other two are found in nature)


Did you guess the first one?



If you guessed the Machete (really big sword) you are right!



(Hint: For the other two, one is a plant, and the other is a reptile)



Did you guessed the plant yet?









If you guessed poison ivy... you are right!








Now the last one (the reptile) is a hard one. Here, I'll zoom in for you... can you see it now?









(Hint: It is nestled near the tree trunk in the middle of the picture near the machete's handle)










Have you got it yet?



No?



Then here's an even closer look...









If you guessed a snake... YOU WIN!!!



How cool is this!






Now the real question is... what kind of snake is this?

This particular snake which was hiding behind our bag of caterpillars is called a Southern Copperhead and it is very venomous/poisonous. Thankfully our fearless leader Mark spotted it before it had a chance to strike anyone! The one we found was about 2 feet long!

What else can you tell me about the Southern Copperhead?